Vimeo
LinkedIn
Instagram
Share |

mars

October 17, 2016

Milky Ways, Snickers, M&Ms, Whiskas, and Pedigree are known around the world but the man credited with that global expansion was a mystery, and that was just the way he liked it.

Milky Ways, Snickers, M&Ms, Whiskas, and Pedigree are known around the world but the man credited with that global expansion was a mystery, and that was just the way he liked it.

“Privacy at times today seems a relic of the non-media past,” Forrest E Mars Jr told Duke University business majors. It “allows us to do the very best we can… without being concerned with self-aggrandisement.”

October 7, 2016

Mars buys out Buffett to take 100% control of Wrigley; LVMH next-gen Alexandre Arnault helps steer RIMOWA acquisition; and Toyota’s personal robot 'Kirobo Mini' signals AI push

Mars buys out Buffett to take 100% control of Wrigley

Mars is to take full control of its Wrigley chewing gum business after Berkshire Hathaway sold its minority stake back to the world’s largest confectionary maker.

According to Reuters, Berkshire invested in Wrigley in 2008 when it acquired $2.1 billion of preferred stock and $4.4 billion of bonds in connection with privately held Mars' $23 billion purchase of the chewing gum maker. 

May 9, 2016

From Koch Industries to Advance Publications, Campden Research has compiled the first-ever list of the Top 10 wholly-owned US family businesses – a group we’ve dubbed ‘The 100% Club’

June 24, 2014

From Brussels to Berlin and Westminster to Washington, family businesses are making themselves heard in the halls of power. But how much influence is enough and how much is too much?

February 25, 2014

The third-largest chocolate maker in the US, Russell Stover Candies, could net the controlling family more than $1 billion if they decide to sell the business.

The third-largest chocolate maker in the US, Russell Stover Candies, could net the controlling family more than $1 billion if they decide to sell the business.

The second-generation of the Ward family are mulling giving up the Missouri-based manufacturer of boxed chocolates, and have appointed investment bank Goldman Sachs to assess their options.

July 25, 2013

When they start a business, many people naturally give it there own name. It suggests solidarity and trustworthiness, and helps a lot in meetings. But is there a moment when it's no longer desirable to be inextricably tied to your family's business?

Earlier this year the French luxury group Pinault-Printemps-Redoute changed its name to Kering. In doing so, it took big step – it shed the family name. The decision to do so was taken by the chairman and CEO, Francois-Henri Pinault, who is the son of the business’s founder (the Printemps and Redoute are from various takeovers). Pinault cited perfectly sound business reasons for the rebranding – chief among them that only 5% of the group’s sales now come from France. Nonetheless, this is a Rubicon many family businesses would struggle to cross.

June 26, 2013

Family business should not be confused with small business in the US

Size matters in the US, which is home to some of the world’s biggest family businesses. The country’s five largest family-controlled firms – Walmart, Ford, Cargill, Koch Industries and Comcast – had combined revenues of $911.9 billion (€694.8 billion) in 2012, more than Indonesia’s GDP.

September 25, 2012

Is wealth generation on the move again, this time from east to west? If two different rich lists, published by Forbes in the US and Hurun in China, are anything to go by, that appears to be the case.

Is wealth generation on the move again, this time from east to west? If two different rich lists, published by Forbes in the US and Hurun in China, are anything to go by, that appears to be the case.
 
According to the Hurun Rich List, which tracks wealth in China, nearly half of the country’s 1,000 richest have seen their fortunes fall this year. The average wealth of the super-rich has dropped by 9% to $860 million (€665 million).
 

June 15, 2011

Family businesses are alive and well in the US, with the top 100 generating approximately $1.6 trillion to America’s $14.6 trillion GDP in 2010. Just under half of the top 100 are owned outright by the family, a higher proportion than in Europe, where Campden’s top 100 family business for the region found that less than a third were fully controlled by the family.

Family businesses are alive and well in the US, with the top 100 generating approximately $1.6 trillion to America’s $14.6 trillion GDP in 2010. Just under half of the top 100 are owned outright by the family, a higher proportion than in Europe, where Campden’s top 100 family business for the region found that less than a third were fully controlled by the family.

Click here >>
Close